Day 5

The Master’s Return

from the The Parables of Jesus reading plan


Matthew 25:1-13, Mark 13:32-37, Luke 12:35-48

In this study of the Parables of Jesus, we are reading many of the stories Jesus used to teach hearers about how to live as His followers. Each day we’ll read parables in their immediate context, focusing on a different category of parables each week. Then we will work through a series of questions to understand the meaning of the text and take to heart the “secrets of the kingdom.”

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Week 1: Parables about God’s Kingdom

Parables are stories with a point. They are designed to make us think about what is being said, why, where, to whom, and in what context. To get to the heart of Jesus’ parables, we need to pull them apart and take a careful look at the details He gives us. One detail that runs through this week’s selection of parables is that Jesus says they all describe the kingdom of God in some way. As you read through these passages, use the following questions to unpack the stories Jesus tells.

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Questions:

1. In Luke’s parable about the master’s return, who are the characters in the story and who do they represent?

2. What issue does this particular parable address, and what is the outcome of the story?

3. What is the central point of this parable?

4. What, if anything, do you find particularly difficult to understand about this parable? What about it seems clear? What is your response to it?

Post Comments (5)

5 thoughts on "The Master’s Return"

  1. Cameron Smith says:

    What do you think God means by being ready? Is he speaking to the unsaved? Is God telling those he preached to that they shouldn’t delay their salvation because they never know when God will return or when they might pass? Or is Jesus speaking to believers? Is He reminding us to stay diligent in our walk with God because we never know when He’ll return?

  2. DeMario Smith says:

    Luke 41

    1. In Luke’s parable about the master’s return, who are the characters in the story and who do they represent?

    The master is Jesus, The Son of God.

    The first servant represents those of us who are diligently seeking His return but are at the same time staying busy doing his will until he arrives.

    The other servant represents those who are no aware that he is coming. They believe that because he hasn’t come yet that they can continue to do what they please and that they have time to get prepared when the master does show up.

    The outcome in both is that the master returns. The outcome with the first servant is that he is able to open the door (prepare the way) without hesitation. The other servant who was found beating the other servants is found in the act and labeled unfaithful.

    2. What issue does this particular parable address, and what is the outcome of the story?

    The issue that is addressed is matter of staying ready versus not being ready for the Lord’s return.

    The outcome in both is that the master returns. The outcome with the first servant is that he is able to open the door (prepare the way) without hesitation. The other servant who was found beating the other servants is found in the act and labeled unfaithful.

    3. What is the central point of this parable?

    The overall point of this parable is that we have a job to do that we can not be caught without doing. We are not called to just go through this life until the Lord arrives. We are called or commissioned to establish his kingdom—to prepare the way and stay ready.

    4. What, if anything, do you find particularly difficult to understand about this parable? What about it seems clear? What is your response to it?

  3. Ryan Schulze says:

    1. In Luke’s parable about the master’s return, who are the characters in the story and who do they represent?
    The master is Jesus. I assume the house is referring to the church. And the managers are those in leadership positions in the church. But there is probably a larger metaphor here as well, that all those who have been placed in charge of something while Christ is not here are equally as responsible as managers. We all have something to steward and we will all be judged by how well we steward it.

    2. What issue does this particular parable address, and what is the outcome of the story?
    There’s an urgency to stewardship. We can’t steward with the mindset that one day we will get it together. Today is the day to get it together.

    3. What is the central point of this parable?
    See above. I guess the problem is that we aren’t always acting as if it is urgent. We as people tend to put off things that could and should be done today till tomorrow.

    4. What, if anything, do you find particularly difficult to understand about this parable? What about it seems clear? What is your response to it?
    We can’t know when God will return. The faith to stay faithful in the midst of that is difficult. It feels like perfection is the only thing that will suffice, as the master could come at any moment of weakness or sin or failure. Thinking about that, I have to believe in God’s sovereignty to know that there is a pattern or posture to faithfulness, not necessarily a perfection in it. We strive therefore for a life with patterns of faithfulness, and postures of repentance.

  4. Kevin says:

    Day 5: 1. The groom represents Christ, and the brides represent us as people.

    2. It shows the that we need to be prepared, but also consistent. We should be chasing after the Lord always, because when he comes, we’re gonna want to be right there with him, not ashamed trying to clean things up.

    3. Stay on your guard. Be a man of God always. Be resentful to God and praise his holy name.

    4. The clarity of wanting to be with the Lord comes out to me. God is our ultimate judge, and I want to be on the good side. Not that I won’t have sinned, but I will walk in the way of the Lord the best I can and bring others along with me.

  5. Tim Bowditch says:

    I am reminded in verse 37 of 1 Peter 5:8

    “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.”

    And Mark mentioned “Be Alert” 3 different times in the passage. The spiritual image of sleepwalking through life is played on here several times in these passages. I am convinced that it is a clear representation of many Christians and non-believers who are not alert and awake to the calling of God on our lives.

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