Day 3

Leviticus

from the This Is the Old Testament reading plan


Leviticus 20:22-26, Hebrews 7:26-28, Hebrews 10:1-18, 1 Peter 1:13-21


This Is the Old Testament is part of a twelve-week thematic overview of the entire Bible. As we read, we’ll gain a broader understanding of the redemptive story of Scripture. Each day we’ll read a thematic selection from a different book of the Bible, along with supplemental passages that show how the theme of that day’s main reading is found throughout Scripture. We’ll also read a brief summary of each book and a reflection on how the book fits into the larger story of Scripture.

What Is Leviticus? The book of Leviticus picks up where Exodus ends, with Israel at Mount Sinai receiving the law. Recorded by Moses, it presents God’s instructions for holiness, including regulations for worship, laws on ceremonial cleanliness, moral laws, and instructions for holy days.

How Leviticus Fits Into the Story: The book of Leviticus contains instructions for the Israelites on how to worship God and live as His holy people. Studying Leviticus opens up a clearer picture of our holy God and a glimpse at what Jesus Christ’s sacrifice has truly done for us. The sacrificial system was established in order to provide atonement for the sins of Israel, and the writer of Hebrews relied on these images in describing the person and role of Jesus Christ: the sacrifice, the priesthood, and the Day of Atonement (Heb 4:14–10:18).

Reflection Questions: 
1. Why does God say He has set the people of Israel apart from the nations?
2. How does today’s reading shape your understanding of the story of redemption?

Take time to reflect on your responses and share what you are learning with others in the community in the comments.

Post Comments (1)

One thought on "Leviticus"

  1. Charlie says:

    Just as God set aside Israel to be His people, He has set me aside through redemption by His son’s blood and death, that I would be cleansed like Israel was by the sacrifices made by priests, but Jesus is the perfect priest who does not first need to cleanse His own sins, He is an immediate advocate for me with the Father. He has built the perfect bridge for restoring that relationship. The bridge built for Israel in the Old Testament was imperfect, as more and more sacrifices were needed to keep God from detesting His people… there must be such a weight in being detested by the creator of all things.

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